Dogs Trust Shrewsbury

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Client: Dogs Trust

Value: £5,250,000

Programme: 50 weeks

Completion Date: June 2011

McPhillips has built what is being termed the “the best animal welfare centre in the world” in a cutting edge £5.25 million eco-friendly re-development for the Dogs Trust.  The world beating construction project on the site of the existing Canine Rehoming Centre at Roden, near Shrewsbury, has been designed to be carbon neutral and is the first building of its kind to achieve BREEAM Outstanding and has achieved the world's highest BREEAM post construction score of 94.44%. Innovative energy saving features have reduced energy consumption by 70 per cent over a traditional rehoming facility and the Centre has achieved an A+ rating for energy efficiency under the UK Building Regulations.

The project was awarded Constructing Excellence's National Project of the Year 2012, West Midlands Centre for Constructing Excellence's 2012 Project of the Year and Integration and Collaborative Working Awards, a Green Apple Gold Award and was highly commended by the Royal Instituiton of Chartered Surveyors.

The redevelopment was completed in two phases to allow the centre to remain open and operational. The first phase from June to December 2010 demolished 16 buildings and upgraded kennels to temporarily accommodate the rehoming centre on the 14 acre site while the new 2,700sq metre centre was built in phase two and consists of a Reception and Rehoming building, Intake Kennels, Training and Behavioural Centre and veterinary facilities.

Built using Passivhaus principles to ensure it is self-sustainable in its energy requirements, the Centre uses bio-fuels grown on site to provide heating. Passivhaus is a method of construction which provides excellent thermal performance and airtightness, minimising heat waste, and as a result the Centre requires very little artificial heating. All parts of the building are designed to save energy to such an extent that it has been selected by the Constructing Excellence organisation as an exemplar of sustainable building (for more details download the Constructing Excellence Case Study.)
 
The timber frame was obtained from sustainable sources and is lined with a Proclima air membrane and voids are filled with Warmcell brown insulation to provide a thermal resistance considerably better than minimum building regulations (0.15W/sqm.K for walls compared to building regulations 0.35W/sqm.K). Air permeability is also significantly better than the existing regulations with a result of 1.01m³/(h.m²) @ 50 Pa compared to 10 m³/(h.m²) @ 50 Pa required by building regulations.  Lime mortar was used in place of cement for the walls to drastically reduce the embodied carbon associated with cement production.
 
Green roofs totalling 750 sq metres feature native species plants and contribute to the excellent heat insulation. Grey water and rainwater are stored in a 25,000 litre underground tank for use in washing out the kennels. On site drainage is provided by a sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) and drains away naturally through a series of swales. The centre also has its own sewage treatment plant for the processing of canine waste.
  
Much of the centre’s power is provided by 130 polycrystalline photo voltaic (solar) panels covering 220 sq metres which produce an output of 30.55kWp and an energy yield of 25035kWh. These alone save an estimated 14.25 tonnes of CO2 annually.  Supplementary heat is provided by a 56kW district heating plant linked to the building management system to provide integrated control of heating and ventilation.
 

 Photography: www.360skylens.co.uk